Mistakes to Avoid When Conducting Business Globally

Moving your business abroad can open new opportunities. In our hyperconnected world, approaching new global markets is easier than it’s ever been. Still, conducting business globally isn’t without its difficulties – new languages, cultural norms and business customs, if not planned for, might get in the way of a successful international plan. Here are some of the most common mistakes that companies make when expanding across the border – read on to make sure that you don’t end up prey to these common pitfalls.

Not Hiring a Qualified Multilingual Team

It’s tempting to send your seasoned team members abroad to start a new office. They’ve proven their loyalty to the company, their work ethic and their skills. Yet just because they’re successful in your local market, doesn’t mean that they’re the perfect person for your overseas expansion.
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#AWarmerWelcome: The True Spirit of Hospitality

What’s one of the biggest worries people have when traveling? 

Hint: It stops more than 30% of travelers from embracing new and different destinations and accommodations.

Booking.com surveyed 20,500 global travelers about various travel topics, including travel ambitions, trip planning habits and biggest fears. Nearly 30% of the people surveyed agreed that one of their biggest worries while traveling was the language barrier, and that this communication worry can even stop them from booking unknown accommodations or a vacation in an exotic locale.

When asked what would remove those travel anxieties, one in five said that language skills would make the difference. If they were sure they would be able to ask questions at their hotel or order their favorite foods, aspiring travelers claimed they’d be more likely to book a new destination.
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Let’s Talk About It, Language Proficiency in the Workplace

We’re operating in a global economy. As a result, competition is far reaching, and companies are increasingly finding themselves at a competitive disadvantage when employees lack the functional language skills needed to do their job. These companies should be considering the following questions; are your employees actually qualified to communicate in another language effectively? How do you assess the functional language ability of your employees? Is the means of assessment reliable and legally defensible?

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